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Recruiters are more stressed; job experience and cultural fit less important in evaluation of candidates

Two out of three recruiters report increased stress levels at work as turnover rates grow higher, according to Jobvite’s 2021 Recruiter Nation Report. Meanwhile, previous job experience and cultural fit are rapidly becoming less important for recruiters’ evaluation of candidates, illustrating a dramatic shift.

Jasper Spanjaart on November 02, 2021 Average reading time: 3 min
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Recruiters are more stressed; job experience and cultural fit less important in evaluation of candidates

There are a multitude of things that can illustrate a similar problem in the European labour market. If we look at the total number of vacancies within Europe, it illustrates a clear need and desire for more applicable applicants. While much has been written about the impending European labour market shortage — it also paints a picture wherein recruiters face a tough job: they need to find, persuade and hire more people.

In many ways, the recruitment climate in Northern America may differ from that in Europe. But as the two continents grapple with similar talent shortage issues, they may have more in common than some think. Every year, Jobvite surveys hundreds of US-based recruiters and HR professionals for its annual Recruiter Nation Report. All to determine where the industry’s priorities lie and current hiring trends. As uncovered in this year’s report, recruiters are confronting a dramatic shift from one year prior, when the world was facing job losses, lay-offs, and staffing reductions. 

Shifted priorities and increased stress levels

Now recruiters face a reality where more talent is needed. And when more talent is needed, it automatically increases the need for recruiters to perform. That in itself has resulted in another key research finding: recruiters widely report increased stress levels. According to the report, 65% of recruiters report at least somewhat increased stress levels since the onset of the pandemic. Meanwhile, 21% say their stress levels have ‘drastically increased’.

‘Recruiters may be more open-minded about candidates’

The report also delves into what it is recruiters use in their evaluation of candidates. The key takeaway in that aspect of recruitment is that they may be more open-minded than in 2017. Among the factors rising in importances: online education or certificates (up by 31% compared to 2017), cover letters (up by 22% compared to 2017), resume format (up by 19% compared to 2017), and online social presence (up by 11% compared to 2017).

Source: Jobvite

82% of recruiters viewed cultural fit as an important factor in 2017, it now only gets a 28% score.

On the other side, multiple things seem to be less important to recruiters. Previous job experience ranked extraordinarily high in 2017 (92%), but is now down 30% in the ranking of important factors when evaluating candidates. The most notable factor is cultural fit. While it ranked relatively high with 82% of recruiters viewing it as an important factor in 2017, it now only gets a 28% score.

TikTok on the rise among recruiters

We previously wrote about the inevitability to use TikTok in recruitment practices when it comes to reaching a younger audience. According to the Recruiter Nation Report, TikTok continues to surge among recruiters. Now, 16% of recruiters use the platform for recruiting efforts — more than doubling the results from the previous year. TikTok is mainly incorporated by younger recruiter, the report finds, with ages 25-34 leading the charge.

Referrals are on the rise

For years, recruitment guru Dr. John Sullivan has preached the effectivity of well laid-out referral programs. In 2021, that sentiment seems to be shared by organisations. 79% of organisations now offer employee referral programs — an 8% increase compared to 2020. Moreover, 48% of organisations say they are seeing higher participation in its employee referral programs.

According to the report, 40% are making more hires from internal employees since the pandemic.

With employers often finding it difficult to find new talent, it has also brought upon more internal hires. According to the report, 40% are making more hires from internal employees since the pandemic. When an organisation does hire from outside its internal workforce, freelancers and gig workers seem to benefit. 35% of organisations are outsourcing more jobs, a 13% upward shift since 2020. That trend looks set to remain, the report notes, with 54% of organisations planning to outsource even more jobs moving forward.

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Jasper Spanjaart

Jasper Spanjaart

Editor-in-Chief and Writer at ToTalent.eu
Editor-in-Chief and writer for European Total Talent Acquisition platform ToTalent.eu.
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